Millions of Brits have no willpower and give in to cravings every single time

Millions of Brits have no willpower and give in to cravings every single time.

 

Chocolate supplied by SWS Digital

The average adult experiences an urge to eat the likes of chocolate, crisps and cheese four times a day – 122 times every month.

An eighth of the population admitted they give in to their desires EVERY time they kick in, and four in 10 surrender to half of them.

The study of 2,000 adults found other popular cravings include bacon, toast and ice cream.

While one quarter admitted they feel ‘unhealthy’, more than a third feel both ‘satisfied’ and ‘guilty’ when they give in.

The research was commissioned by Kallo as it prepares to unveil its restaurant pop-up, mysteriously named 'KRC'.

The pop-up will serve up a range of takeaway dishes morning, noon and night, to satisfy any type of takeaway food craving – just don’t expect the traditional kebab and chips.

Instead, you can sample wares like the ‘Halloumi Doner’, with Kallo’s lentil cake, topped with sliced aubergine, halloumi, tomato salad and chilli sauce.
Kallo’s brand controller Duncan Bell said: “This research shows just how often we get cravings and how hard they are to avoid.

"The large percentage of these cravings are for foods we class as unhealthy.

“It’s often a struggle to satisfy these desires – a piece of fruit may not make us feel as content as a chocolate biscuit – or healthy food isn’t seen as ‘convenient’ as unhealthy snacks which we can simply grab and eat.

“We hope our pop-up will inspire more Brits to cure their cravings by making homemade healthier snacks, using fresh ingredients commonly found in the home.”

The research also found chocolate, crisps and cake are the top foods we feel most ‘guilty’ about wanting.

The prime time for cravings to kick in is the after-lunch slump – at precisely 3:31pm.

And the average time to give in was found to be 3.50pm, showing Brits can only keep their willpower strong for around 20 minutes.

Similarly, over a quarter of respondents said they get more cravings on weekdays than weekends.

Temptations are also high between 8-10pm, and to avoid cravings a third said they ‘distract’ themselves.

A further two in 10 attempt to turn to something ‘healthy’ instead and a quarter drink some water to help pass the craving.

Over four in 10 also pre-plan their meals in order to try and avoid snacks, but Brits predict they spend around £9 on satisfying their food desires every week.

But it all comes down to the taste, as 43 per cent admitted they are most likely to surrender to a sweet craving, while one quarter would give in to savoury.

One tenth admitted giving in leaves them feeling ashamed and frustrated and over half – 57 per cent – wish there were more healthy alternatives.

And over two thirds said they cave in to unhealthy cravings because they are more ‘convenient’.

But four in 10 of those surveyed via OnePoll find if they have healthy snacks they are less likely to want junk food.

While the majority of Brits seem to know what they’re doing when it comes to food choices, one in 10 admitted they are not confident in their knowledge of healthy and unhealthy foods.

And almost half – 47 per cent – worryingly find seeing foods online or in adverts makes them want it more.

TV chef Gizzi Erskine commented: "As somebody who has been part of pop-ups from the beginning, it’s always cool to see innovative ideas developing, so I was happy to be asked to be part of Kallo’s KRC pop up.

“When it comes to my craving it has to be Crispy Tuna Rice, which has its origins in the Californian food scene.

"It’s a confusing type of craving that feels like you’re craving junk, but it’s actually pretty healthy.”